The Dashboard Spy

August 5, 2008

Naval Aviation Readiness Dashboard

Filed under: Dashboard Screenshots — Tags: — dashboardspy @ 1:45 pm

Did you know that the U.S. Navy consciously runs itself like a business enterprise? That includes embracing the value of enterprise dashboards and other business intelligence tools.

The Navy has an overarching program called Naval Aviation Enterprise (NAE) that is operated much like a $60 billion corporation. It’s overall vision is to “To deliver the right force with the right readiness at the right cost at the right time … today, and in the future.”

“It’s about collaborating, sharing and enhancing our business practices. Not to turn the Navy into a business, but to understand the business of the Navy so that we remain the most effective and efficient Navy in the world.”

— CNO Admiral Gary Roughead, March 2008

Let’s have a look at an enterprise dashboard (what the Navy likes to call Cockpit Charts) that monitors progress to goal in the area of mission readiness.

Here is a screenshot. In the interest of security, I’m showing a low-resolution image. Click on the “read more” link after the screen shot for a discussion of the relevant metrics used in this readiness dashboard.

Enterprise Dashboard used by the US Navy

Enterprise Dashboard used by the US Navy

 

Let’s have a look at the metrics featured on this enterprise dashboard:

The Navy has provided an explanation of the KPIs on this dashboard. The synopsis is presented in this image which lays out the explanations in a manner similar to the dashboard itself.

KPIs for Naval Aviation Enterprise Dashboard

KPIs for Naval Aviation Enterprise Dashboard

For those truly interested in the nitty gritty, here is a closer look at one of the metrics as well as an overall explanation of the dashboard metrics.

Metrics used by the US Navy for mission readiness

Metrics used by the US Navy for mission readiness

Metrics, which are used to track and measure performance, are key elements to achieving cost-wise readiness.   Presenting that information to decision-makers and stakeholders can be daunting when different type/model/series (T/M/Ss), systems and missions are involved.   The Cockpit chart (CpC) is a set of seven graphics used by the Naval Aviation Enterprise (NAE) to depict Current Readiness information in a coherent, uniform and concise format.  The two main charts (called “panels”) are the Overall Mission-Rating (M-Rating) Accomplishment and the RFT (Ready for Tasking) Availability.  

The Overall M-Rating Accomplishment

Each T/M/S CpC includes result and driver measurements. Driver measurements are the issues that “drive” the results for readiness.  As the numbers in the driver panels change, so should the result panels.   Just like in an aircraft, CpCs monitor performance; one indicator does not reveal the entire health of a T/M/S.  The “panels” and “gauges” only alert leadership to the possibility of a problem that require deeper research and investigation to determine its root cause.

2 Comments »

  1. Concerning the business dashboard: I think as the numbers in the driver panels change, so should the result panels. Just like in an aircraft, CpCs monitor performance; one indicator does not reveal the entire health of a T/M/S. The “panels” and “gauges” only alert leadership to the possibility of a problem that require deeper research and investigation to determine its root cause.

    Go Business Intelligence!!

    Comment by George G. Wills — August 5, 2008 @ 1:59 pm

  2. […] Read More Posted under DashboardSpy | […]

    Pingback by Naval Aviation Readiness Dashboard | Dashboard Examples - Samples - Tutorials — January 25, 2009 @ 4:40 pm


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